Under $250

James Banks

Individually Sold Vials of Charm Objects and Gems

jb-cg
Price:

$120

Individually Sold Vials of Charm Objects and Gems
additional images:
  • Individually Sold Vials of Charm Objects and Gems
  • Individually Sold Vials of Charm Objects and Gems
  • Individually Sold Vials of Charm Objects and Gems
  • Individually Sold Vials of Charm Objects and Gems
Select your own personal collection of charms from this box of James Banks vials. Whether you choose a teensy gold peace sign, a miniature of the Eiffel Tower rendered in yellow gold, a tiny silver shell or a minute shimmering gem (to name only a few) - you will by symbolizing your own personal thought, message or feeling. Add them to The Monocle Pendant or The Light Keeper Pendant.

Each tiny charm is sold separately and priced accordingly. Available: shell, palm tree, pocket watch, martini glass, skull, Eiffel Tower, butterfly, peace sign, emerald, ruby, sapphire

Each charm will be sent in its own glass vial.

Please contact us to order.



sterling silver scallop shell : $65
rose bronze conch shell : $65
sterling silver palm tree : $65
rose bronze pocket watch : $65
sterling silver martini glass : $65
sterling silver skull : $65
rose bronze skull : $65
18K yellow gold eiffel tower : $120
18K yellow gold rose : $120
sterling silver butterfly : $65
18K yellow gold butterfly : $120
18K yellow gold peace sign : $120
emerald : $100
ruby : $100
sapphire : $100

New York / Los Angeles - The brilliant bicoastal collaboration between Adam Shulman and Heidi Nahser Fink has resulted in the magical collection of James Banks jewelry. Each meticulously hand-crafted piece is inspired by the natural world and its intriguing details as well as the eclectic and talismanic qualities of objects like the light bulb and monocle. The attention to detail is the captivating mainstay of this collection - from butterfly wings that move to a light bulb which opens and can be customized by adding tiny, symbolic objects and jewels. “We want people to get close, to get a conversation from it,” Shulman says. “We want them to come up to it and ask ‘What is that?’